Category: Identification, Prevention and Treatment

Identification

It is critical that FASD is identified or even better still, diagnosed as soon as possible.  Some times it cant be identified until the child reaches puberty, other times it is clearly evident at birth.  The sooner the condition can be identified or diagnosed, the sooner that strategies, interventions and accommodations can be put into place, the better it will be for the child and family.  If inapproprate strategies are used eg strategies that are usually used for people without a cognitive impairment, further damage can be done. 

It is therefore critical that as soon as it is identified that FASD may be a factor, that appropraite strategies, interventions and accommodations are utilised.  Should the condition not be FASD, no harm will be done by using these strategies.

Prevention

FASD is usually said to be 100% preventable.  The rffada does not believe this is the case.  There are always reasons that alcohol is consumed.  In Australia, those reasons are primarily lack of education (ie media campaign) and lack of consistent messages from health practitioners.  There are also unplanned pregnancies which account for around 50% if pregnancies. 

Treatment

There is no ‘treatment’ as such for FASD however managing the many secondary conditions that affect people with FASD is critical.  Medication is one of the most critical interventions that can be used to support a person with FASD.  There are other evidence-based strategies; practice-based strategies and wisdom-based strategies which are also important. 

Online training for professionals

This CPD accredited course has been adapted for use in the UK by health professionals and everyone interested in increasing their knowledge about FASD. It is funded by the Alcohol Education and Research Council.

Alcohol in pregnancy – training for midwives

This is a three-year project to train midwives across the country about FASD. This year NOFAS-UK organised two CPD accredited study days for midwives.

The next study days are on 4th March in London and 18th March in Manchester (click here for details). To book a place please call 0208 458 5951 or complete the Booking Form and email it to info@nofas-uk.org

To receive one complimentary copy of the “Alcohol in Pregnancy – Information for Midwives” booklet, please email: info@nofas-uk.org with your full postal address and profession.

Canada: The Importance of Early Diagnosis and Intervention for Kids with FASD 

MediaPlanet 13 Apr 2021 – The Importance of Early Diagnosis and Intervention for Kids with FASD Based on recent epidemiological studies, it’s estimated that there are over one million people with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in Canada, making this one of the leading causes of developmental disability in the country.